Tag Archives: Shane A

Happiness is a Fiesta

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Happiness is a Fiesta

Exhibition of work by Photographer Shane Aurousseau

Exhibition of work by Photographer Shane Aurousseau curated by Outwalls at Leyas Camden High Street. Why not drop in, have a coffee and relax while viewing some unique images. All prints are personally signed by Shane A, are limited Outwalls editions and for sale, give a family member or friend a unique Christmas gift. Prints are on Innova museum quality acid free cotton paper printed with long lasting pigment inks making them of the highest art exhibition quality.

Location: Leyas, 20 Camden High Street NW1 OJH very near Mornington Crescent tube station and in the newly revamped square now one of London’s most thriving meeting places.

Kind Regards,

Ruta Sasnauskaite

Curator at Outwalls

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The Shopping Trip

Shane Aurousseau an Australian Photographer has worked in Sydney, London and Amsterdam as a creative director with some of the World’s largest advertising agencies with client’s such as Time magazine and Time Life Books. He has also produced designs and photographs for record label covers and has been published regularly by glossy magazines. He has had exhibitions in Sydney, Amsterdam, Madrid (sponsored by the American Women’s association) and now London. He is currently a resident of the UK living in London; he studied art and photography in Australia. Shane now travels extensively and produces high quality images from around the Globe ,promoting the diverse nature of our incredible planet. His images of London have appeared on posters and postcards in some 300 shops throughout the city including the key tourist shops in the West End.

In his photography Shane covers everything from the city views to landscapes, urban street life and remote Australian outback, portraits of his friends and strangers that he saw passing by. His photography can easily be described as documentary or journalistic. A sense of the beautiful diversity of the world reflects through Shane’s lens.

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Happiness is a Fiesta

Outwalls is glad to have the opportunity to invite you to see Shane Aurousseau’s photography exhibition “Diversity World”. The exhibition held at Leyas, a local coffee shop in Mornington Crescent Camden very close to the Tube and Koko’s night club. Outwalls is a curatorial project aiming to exhibit a range of artists within social spaces, creating a more approachable link between audience and artist. Why not drop in, have a coffee and see some unique images – remember it’s Christmas and a unique gift is something to be treasured.

​Outwalls
Curator: Ruta Sasnauskaite
outwalls.info@gmail.com
07901575753
Photographer:  Shane Aurousseau
https://twitter.com/Growlerythought
http://www.kiamafoto.com
http://www.shaneasite.com

 

 

 

 

 

Australia and water management a similar issue to the Colorado River in the USA

Some time ago I wrote a blog on the issues of bad water management in Australia. A country that many believe is one of the driest in the world. In fact Australia has one of the largest catchments on the globe of fresh water in the Great Artesian Basin covering a third of the country.

Australia the Great Artesian Basin covers a third of the country
Australia the Great Artesian Basin covers a third of the country

The Artesian Basin can be mapped from the top north through Queensland into New South Wales and the Northern Territory. Yet water from the Darling, Murray river system one of the greatest river basins in the world is being plundered. This water system covers 3,375 Kilometers (2,097 miles) in length. The  Darling, Murray basin spreads out over 1,061,469 sq Km (409,835 sq ml). Water is being pumped out of this great river system at an alarming rate an example is Cubbie station Queensland the largest irrigation property in the southern hemisphere damming off from the Darling river system more water than is in Sydney harbour. This water theft continues along the entire system into South Australia with large properties pumping these great rivers dry in many cases to irrigate crops that are not natural to the country, cotton being one such crop. This mismanagement is placing pressure on the natural environment and indigenous commodities. In the 1800s and early 1900s this great river system was alive with water traffic, steamers carried passengers, wool and grain .

Australia Darling river transport
Australia Darling river transport
Wilcannia on the Darling River NSW today -image Shane Aurousseau
Wilcannia on the Darling River NSW today -image Shane Aurousseau

Today especially the Darling river it is lucky if a rubber bath duck could navigate the system. Management of the Artisian basin would not only take pressure off the great systems of the Darling and Murray it would also open the potential of the great Australian inland. The plundering of the two great rivers of Australia in currently a major issue of anger towards the federal and state governments especially from the smaller property stations that need fresh water irrigation along the system. There is also anger from the aboriginal community who own many of the river bank rights in Australia. There is a great feeling in the Aboriginal community that the natural environment is being plundered by an uncaring ethnic European government thus widening the gap between these two indigenous groups.

1918-lancahire-lass-and-barge-darling-river
1918-lancahire-lass-and-barge-darling-river
Australia Belswick Merino Stud Condobolin NSW
Australia Belswick Merino Stud Condobolin NSW
Darling River today - image Shane Aurousseau
Darling River today – image Shane Aurousseau

The issue of Water management in Australia is not dissimilar to the problems faced by communities along the Colorado River in the United States.

The Colorado River starts in Rocky Mountain National Park along the jagged edge of the Continental Divide at over 12,000 feet of elevation. The river cascades, flows, tumbles, and rumbles through 1,450 miles of mountains, canyons, high plains, and low deserts on its journey to the Sea of Cortez

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Disappearing Colorado River USA

in Mexico. The entire Southwest United States completely depends on the Colorado River and its tributaries – the states of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming, and California use the river’s water for farming, drinking, growing lawns, and generating hydroelectric power.

Thirty million people in the Southwest use the Colorado River’s water for their material sustenance; millions more use the river itself for recreation and spiritual enjoyment. The river quenches our thirst, feeds our souls, enlivens our senses. And we are not the only inhabitants using this river – its waters, canyons, and habitats provide a vibrant but deeply threatened ecosystem for untold numbers of plant and animal species. All of these competing demands make the Colorado River one of the most contested and controlled rivers on Earth. Over the last decade, humans have drained all of the river’s water – all 5 trillion gallons – before it reaches the Sea of Cortez. The Colorado River is in very bad shape and deeply threatened.

To serve the needs of human populations, for the last decade the Colorado River has been completely drained dry by the time it reaches the Sea of Cortez. While the destruction of the river is a clear and obvious consequence of our actions, additional threats to the Colorado River – from its headwaters in Rocky Mountain National Park, all the way to its dry destiny near the Sea of Cortez – are increasing with each tick of the clock.

Climate change is looming, population growth is escalating, more dams and diversions are planned, species are on the brink of extinction, oil/gas/mineral exploration near the river is increasing, and invasive species are continuing their march up and down the river and its tributaries.

The Save the Colorado campaign won’t be able to address all of these threats, but it’s important to tell the whole story and begin the critical work of restoration. http://savethecolorado.org/

As a species we are extremely bad at managing our natural resources.

Shane Aurousseau